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Megan Sweas

Writer, Editor, Student of Life

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Women

For Catholic women, the relationship between faith and politics is subtle—and sometimes in conflict

Published by America: The Jesuit Review, January 16, 2018

Having spent two years as a volunteer in Amate House, a Chicago-based Catholic volunteer program, Leslie Carranza is committed to the values of service, faith, social justice and community. She now brings what she learned about Catholic social teaching into the voting booth with her. But the church’s influence on her choices is, as with many Catholic voters, complex.

Continue reading “For Catholic women, the relationship between faith and politics is subtle—and sometimes in conflict”

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Italian convents act as safe houses in trafficking portal

Published in Global Sisters Report, January 12, 2015

The girl was waiting at the sisters’ gate one morning in August.

Before her 18th birthday, Elizabeth had already traveled across the Sahara and the Mediterranean on her way from Nigeria to Europe and spent six months in a brothel in Denmark. She was being prepared to start working on the streets of Italy when she found her way to Casa Rut, a safe house for trafficking victims. Continue reading “Italian convents act as safe houses in trafficking portal”

Unable to work, Indian immigrant women turn to spiritual practices for comfort

Published by The Washington Post, Huff Post Religion & Religion News Service, May 10, 2012

Pooja Sindhwani
Pooja Sindhwani and her husband, Karan Kakar

Even though she met her husband through an arranged marriage, Pooja Sindhwani considers herself a modern woman. She worked in interior design in her native India for four years, and she and her husband spent a year getting to know each other before their wedding. When she followed her husband to Houston, she wasn’t worried about adjusting to life in the United States.

“You feel you’re going to a country that offers opportunities,” Sindhwani said, “you expect that things will work out.”

Except when they don’t.

Unable to land a job in Houston, Sindhwani slipped into depression. Like thousands of Indian women, she was issued an H-4 “dependent spouse” visa that did not allow her to work. …

Read more on WashingtonPost.com

 

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