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Megan Sweas

Writer, Editor, Student of Life

Author

Megan Sweas

For Catholic women, the relationship between faith and politics is subtle—and sometimes in conflict

Published by America: The Jesuit Review, January 16, 2018

Having spent two years as a volunteer in Amate House, a Chicago-based Catholic volunteer program, Leslie Carranza is committed to the values of service, faith, social justice and community. She now brings what she learned about Catholic social teaching into the voting booth with her. But the church’s influence on her choices is, as with many Catholic voters, complex.

Continue reading “For Catholic women, the relationship between faith and politics is subtle—and sometimes in conflict”

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Change Is Happening in the Catholic Church, Just Not on Holy Thursday

Published by On Being, USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture, March 24, 2016

Even when I feel disconnected from my faith, Holy Thursday draws me to church. The call to follow Jesus’ example and wash one another’s feet speaks to me, a marginal Catholic more interested in service than doctrine. Continue reading “Change Is Happening in the Catholic Church, Just Not on Holy Thursday”

Will a Thriving Singles Scene Renew American Catholicism?

Published by Religion Dispatches, Center for Religion and Civic Culture, February 12, 2016

As the choir rehearses before St. Monica’s Sunday evening Mass, two blond women in skinny jeans slide into a pew in the rear of the church and chat quietly. A few pews back a woman wearing a mid-thigh length dress and a long sweater genuflects before beginning to pray. Before long, the church is filled with attractive people under 40.

St. Monica Catholic Community is a destination parish for young adults in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles with a reputation for being the place where young, attractive Catholics go to seek somebody special—and I don’t mean Jesus.

Continue reading “Will a Thriving Singles Scene Renew American Catholicism?”

JAWS Board Member Blog Post: Setting Goals for 2016

This post originally appeared on JAWS.org.

I have never been one for New Year’s resolutions. Eat better and work out more; make new friends and spend time with loved ones; read more and write more; gain more Twitter followers — and spend less time on social media. Our goals for personal and professional improvement can seem to me to be overwhelming, sometimes contradictory and let’s face it, unachievable without a few extra hours a day. Add “Become more efficient and waste less time” to the list!

Continue reading “JAWS Board Member Blog Post: Setting Goals for 2016”

Happy New Year! Update and Well-Wishes

I hope you had a wonderful 2015.

It’s interesting to look back on my greetings from the past few years, filled with both the excitement and uncertainty of freelancing. In 2015, I’ve “settled in” to a staff position again, though nobody can sit still for long at the USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture. Continue reading “Happy New Year! Update and Well-Wishes”

Praying for Rain in California

This piece originally appeared in the Yale ISM Review.

“As an American Indian, all my life I have been cursed with the myth of the ‘Indian rain dance,’” Johnny P. Flynn wrote in Religion Dispatches in 2012 when the United States Agricultural Secretary, Tom Vilsack, suggested a rain dance to end a drought. “I am here to say there is no such thing. Not in my Potawatomi tribe or in any other tribe across the Americas.” Weather-related rituals, Flynn wearily pointed out—including the Hopi’s famous late summer dances—recognize the season rather than bring on the rain.

That hasn’t stopped some from trying. Continue reading “Praying for Rain in California”

Cristo Rey model successful, but not for everyone

Education Dive interviewed Megan Sweas about Cristo Rey model of education, December 21, 2015

It also named Putting Education to Work as one of six books educators should read.

During her time as an editor at U.S. Catholic magazine, journalist Megan Sweas saw firsthand what graduates of the Cristo Rey network could accomplish. Continue reading “Cristo Rey model successful, but not for everyone”

Japanese Americans remember Pearl Harbor backlash and support Muslims

Published by Religion News Service, Deseret News December 11, 2015

After 9/11, Kathy Masaoka heard a Muslim woman on the radio describe her hesitancy to go to the market for fear of being attacked.

“It crystalized for me at that moment, that this must be how my parents felt and how my family felt after Pearl Harbor,” she said. Continue reading “Japanese Americans remember Pearl Harbor backlash and support Muslims”

Learning from History: The Japanese Internment and Reactions to Muslim Americans

Published by the USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture, November 24, 2015

When Roanoke, Virginia Mayor David Bowers referred to the internment of the Japanese Americans in the context of the terrorist attacks by ISIS, he wasn’t the first to see the parallels between World War II and today. Japanese and Muslim American community leaders also have recognized that the fear of Muslims following terrorist attacks reflects the fear of Japanese following Pearl Harbor. Continue reading “Learning from History: The Japanese Internment and Reactions to Muslim Americans”

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